Wet Basement | Muncie, IN

Wet Basement | Muncie, IN | Everdry Waterproofing of Northern Indiana

Basement Waterproofing and Foundation Repair Professionals

EverDry Waterproofing is Indiana’s #1 Basement Waterproofer. EverDry specializes in basement waterproofing, foundation repair and crawlspace waterproofing. Our patented, safe, and effective waterproofing method can be used on foundations consisting of poured concrete, block, brick, stone, red clay tile plus crawl spaces and slabs. We have been in business for more than 30 years and have over 85,000 “RAVING FANS”. Everdry professionals take a personal one-on-one approach in educating homeowners so they truly understand all their options for creating a safe, dry, usable space in their basements. The EverDry Modern Drainage System takes care of surface water and the water that enters through cracks in your foundation wall. The EverDry Pressure Relief System handles hydrostatic pressure that exist under your basement, which causes water to seep through floor cracks and at the seam where the floor and wall meet leading to lower block water, discolorations and mold. We will perform a thorough inspection of the interior and exterior of your home, and leave you with a permanent repair estimate. Contact the professionals at Everdry Waterproofing today!

Facts About Muncie, IN

Muncie is a city in Center Township and the county seat of Delaware County in east central Indiana. As of the2010 Census, the city’s population was 70,085. It is the principal city of the Muncie, Indiana, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 118,769.

Muncie is the home of Ball State University and the Ball Corporation (1888–1998) and the birthplace of the comic stripGarfield. Thanks to the Middletown studies first conducted in the 1920s, it is said to be one of the most studied U.S. cities of its size.

The area was first settled in the 1770s by the Lenape people, who had been transported from their tribal lands in the Mid-Atlantic region (all of New Jersey plus southeastern New York, eastern Pennsylvania, and northern Delaware) to Ohio and eastern Indiana. They founded several towns along the White River including Munsee Town (according to historical map of “The Indians” by Clark Ray), near the site of present-day Muncie.

In 1818, the tribes were forced to cede this land to the federal government and move farther west. The area was opened to white settlers two years later.

The city of Muncie was incorporated in 1865. Contrary to popular legend, the city is not named after a mythological Chief Munsee; it was actually named after Munsee Town, the white settlers’ name for the Indian village on the site, “Munsee” meaning a member of the Lenape people or one of their languages.

Muncie was lightly disguised as “Middletown” by a team of sociologists, led by Robert and Helen Lynd, who were only the first to conduct a series of studies in Muncie; considered a typical Middle-American community; in their case, a study funded by the Rockefeller Institute of Social and Religious Research. In 1929, the Lynds published Middletown: A Study in Contemporary American Culture. They returned to re-observe the community during the Depression and published Middletown in Transition: A Study in Cultural Conflicts (1937). Later in the century, the National Science Foundation funded a third major study that resulted in two books by Theodore Caplow, Middletown Families (1982) and All Faithful People (1983). Caplow returned in 1998 to begin another study, Middletown IV, which became part of a PBS Documentary entitled “The First Measured Century,” released in December 2000. The Ball State Center for Middletown Studies continues to survey and analyze social change in Muncie. An enormous database of the Middletown surveys conducted between 1978 and 1997 is available online from ARDA, American Religion Data Archive. Due to the extensive information collected from the Middletown studies over the last century, Muncie is said to be one of the most studied cities of its size in the United States

According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 27.39 square miles (70.9 km2), of which 27.20 square miles (70.4 km2) (or 99.31%) is land and 0.19 square miles (0.49 km2) (or 0.69%) is water.

From the late 19th century, Muncie’s economic backbone has been industry, primarily manufacturing.

The Indiana Gas Boom of the 1880s drew many factories to the region. The Ball Brothers moved their glass factory from Buffalo to Muncie, beginning glass production there on March 1, 1888.[14] This relationship with Muncie ended 110 years later, when the Ball Corporation moved its corporate headquarters to Broomfield, Colorado, in 1998.

Other notable manufacturers with plants in the city have included BorgWarner, The Broderick Company (former division of Harsco), Dayton-Walther Corporation, Delco Remy,General Motors (New Venture Gear), Hemingray Glass Company, Indiana Steel and Wire, and Westinghouse. Most of these factories closed or moved during a tumultuous period for the city beginning in the 1970s. From 2001 to 2011, thousands of jobs were lost. Many smaller, non-unionized, manufacturing businesses have survived this transition, such as Maxon Corporation (now Honeywell), Duffy Tool (now North American Stamping), Reber Machine & Tool, Magna Powertrain, and a dozen or so other shops which employ anywhere from a few dozen to a few hundred workers. In 2009, Muncie became the United States headquarters for Brevini Wind, an Italian-based company that manufactures gearboxes for wind turbines. In 2011, locomotive maker Progress Rail Services (a subsidiary of Caterpillar Inc.) opened in the former Westinghouse facility, which had been vacant since 1998.

The first decade of the 21st century saw a cultural shift toward local businesses and economic empowerment, boosted by the Muncie Downtown Development Partnership and the residents, patrons, and business owners of the downtown community. In 2007, Muncie was rated the most affordable college town in America by real estate company Coldwell Banker. In 2014, Forbes ranked Muncie 34th among small places for business and careers, and 20th for cost of doing business.

WHERE TO FIND US:
Everdry Waterproofing of Northern Indiana
6134 Moeller Rd
Fort Wayne, IN 46806
Phone: (260) 493-4100
Toll-Free: 866-424-391